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Decrease Prison Noise with an FM Transmitter

Call Dave at 1-603-755-3851

How Far Does The Whole House FM Transmitter Go?
How Many Frequencies Do You Offer
Will It Work With My Audio Source?
What Is The Cable With The Red & White RCA Jacks For?
My Audio Source Doesn't Have A Volume Control, What Do I Do?
Will Leaving My Whole House FM Transmitter On 24/7 Harm It?
I Lost My 110/220V AC Adapter, Can I Use Some Other One?
Why Doesn't My FM Transmitter Turn On?
What Is The Maximum Distance An FM Transmitter Can Go Without A License?
Is This FM Transmitter Designed To Comply With FCC Part 15 Rules And What Exactly Are The FCC Rules?Why Does the FCC use Microvolts(µV) to Determine the Power Output (Field Strength) of a FM Transmitter And Not Watts?

I'm Having A Little Trouble Can Someone Help Me?

Why Don't I Hear Anything On My FM Radio?

When do I need to use an audio converter

How Far Does The Whole House FM Transmitter Go?
We guarantee 150 feet in all directions for a typical family home, that’s over 70,000 square feet of coverage. Since the average home is around 2,000 square feet, according to National Association of Home Builders, it shouldn’t be a problem to cover your entire house. Even Bill Gates’ home is “only” 48,000 square feet!

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How Many Frequencies Do You Offer
The Whole House FM Transmitter 2.0 allows you to cover the full range of FM frequencies from 88.1 to 107.9 FM. It also lets you select frequencies in 1 MHz steps so countries who use the even frequencies can also use our fm transmitter.


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Will It Work With My Audio Source?
The quick answer is, YES! We’ll put it this way we have never run into an audio source that it can’t work on. Since it doesn’t need any software or downloads to operate its compatible with anything. Some of the most popular audio sources are iPod, other MP3 Players, TV (including HD), DVD & VCR Players, Computer (PC and Mac), Satellite Radio (Sirius and XM), and Home Stereo Systems just to name a few.


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What Is The Cable With The Red & White RCA Jacks For?
This is a special custom made cable enabling you to broadcast from devices like DVD & VCR players that do not have an earphone jack but only RCA jacks. You can also use it to broadcast from a home theater or stereo tuner and some satellite radio units. The in-line volume control allows you to adjust the output volume into the FM transmitter. If you were to plug a RCA jack line out directly into the FM transmitter it would over power the audio and sound distorted. You can purchase this cable from us so make sure you keep it in a safe place when not in use.


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My Audio Source Doesn't Have A Volume Control, What Do I Do?
We built into the Whole House FM Transmitter 2.0 the ability to control the volume comming into the fm transmitter so you can help prevent over modulation.


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Will Leaving My Whole House FM Transmitter On 24/7 Harm It?
No, it won’t. We didn’t want an FM Transmitter that was so delicate that we had to remember to turn if off or else it would fry some circuitry or melt something so we built it to last, you can run this thing 24/7 without ever having to shut it off. We have a few of our FM Transmitters that have been running for several years now non-stop and not one moment of trouble.


And yes, even when running it in a hot car during summer won’t hurt it… just don’t leave it in direct sunlight like on your dashboa


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I Lost My 110/220V AC Adapter, Can I Use Some Other One?
NO, using a power supply other than the one included with the FM transmitter WILL damage the unit and void the money back guarantee.


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Why Doesn't My FM Transmitter Turn On?
Are you aware that there is a power switch on top of the fm transmitter?
Is the power cord firmly attached to the FM transmitter?
Is the AC adapter plugged into the wall?
Have you tried another power source? Like use batteries or the USB Power cable with your computer to power it instead of the AC Adapter (or vice versa)?
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What Is The Maximum Distance An FM Transmitter Can Go Without A License?
The quick answer is approximately 200 feet for an FM Transmitter Covered under Part 15 (Read FCC Public Notice dated July 24, 1991). The correct answer is much more complicated than that. Which is 250 µV/meter @ 3 meters (also measured as 48 dBuV/m)


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Is This FM Transmitter Designed To Comply With FCC Part 15 Rules And What Exactly Are The FCC Rules?
Yes, the Whole House FM Transmitter 2.0 complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules, Section 15.239(b) which states:


The field strength of any emissions within the permitted 200 KHz (88 – 108MHz) band shall not exceed 250 microvolts/meter at 3 meters. The emission limit in this paragraph is based on measurement instrumentation employing an average detector.


Since this is a question the FCC receives a lot they have also issued a Public Noticed dated July 24, 1991 to help clarify any questions.


(FCC ID: XOAWH-FMT and for Canada it’s IC.8728A-WHFMT)


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Why Does the FCC use Microvolts(µV) to Determine the Power Output (Field Strength) of a FM Transmitter And Not Watts?
Great question, the best source we’ve found to help explain that is at Ramsey Electronics.com. Below is a copy of what they say:


The new FCC Part 15 Rules specify a maximum “Field Strength” of your transmitted signal. Since it is unlikely that you have the equipment to carry out accurate field strength measurements in microvolts, it is useful to understand at least the theory of field strength so that you can understand both what you can expect from such transmitters, and what limits the FCC intends. Previous limits on nonlicensed FM-broadcast band devices were defined as a maximum field strength of 40µV per meter measured at a distance of 15 meters.


The June 1989 revised rule specifies a maximum of 250 µV per meter, but measured at 3 meters from your antenna. The term, “250µV per meter” means that an accurate field-strength meter with a calibrated and scaled 1-meter antenna may indicate a maximum signal field strength of 250µV (In contrast, non-licensed operation from 26.96 to 27.28 MHz, your standard CB walkie-talkie, is limited to a field strength of 10,000 µV per meter at 3 meters).


In all cases, the field strength of a signal decreases in direct proportion to the distance away from the antenna. Power decreases by the square of distance: for every doubling in distance, the signal power is quartered, but the field strength voltage is only halved. Using this theory, we can construct a simple chart to show the maximum permitted performance of a non-licensed FM band transmitter. The theoretical figures assume a simple 1 meter receiving antenna in all cases and do not take into consideration that reception can be greatly enhanced with larger, multi-element antennas and preamplifiers on the receiver. In the following chart, the field strength (theoretical minimum) gets stronger as you move from the edge of these circular boundaries toward the antenna:


FAQ’s